Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

 

Automotive V.i.n. Numbers What Do They Mean

V.I.N. V.I.N.s. You will hear this term tossed around frequently by car sales people, auto insurance people among others in the automotive trade. What does the term “VIN” mean and how it is important to you?

The term V.I.N. is short form of “Vehicle Identification Number”. It’s a unique number that is assigned to your vehicle – be it car, truck, S.U.V., van truck, motorcycle or any other vehicle. Think of the VIN as the Social Insurance Number for your automotive vehicle.

In order to register a vehicle, especially a new vehicle, you will need its V.I.N. In order to insure your vehicle ditto. If your car is stolen it may well be tracked down and identified by this unique listing – it’s V.I.N. If you are in the market for a vehicle and do a vehicle history search – say at Carfax or a similar online service and the lookup will all be done by V.I.N. How else could the system work if each vehicle did not have its own unique identifying number? Through such automated systems you can quickly and accurately determine vehicle history since new – a list of owners , any accident reports , has the car been involved in a major accident , been written off , been in a flood , have liens or charges against it , as well as many additional concerns for auto buyers ,financers , and dealers.

How can you determine the V.I.N. of your vehicle? That is easy if have ready access to your registration and insurance documentation. If not, or if you want to confirm the VIN number assignment you can simply find out your vehicles stamp. Simply look through the windshield on the driver’s side of the auto at the corner of the dash. It should be clearly stamped on a plate attached to the dash. As well that same designation should be clearly listed on your bill of sale. If the 2 numbers do not match – this could be a sign of future trouble if you are ever involved in a collision and have to deal with auto insurance claims and payment to yourself or your auto body shop.

A short course in how to read a VIN to be of use to you – should you be in the car buying mode, need registration information or want to import a car into Canada. Where an auto is manufactured often determines import duties and taxes.

Reading a V.I.N. First things first look at the first number on the left hand side. This first character designates where the vehicle was built – 1 is the US, 2 is Canada, 3 is Mexico, J for Japan, K for Korea for example.

Next the second character in line designates the manufacturer or who built the car. The letter “G: stands for General Motor or G.M. products. Next is the third character – in this example if the number 2 is the third character – this would indicate the Pontiac division of GM. Characters 4 and 5 indicate the car line series, eight represents the body style for example 2 door coupe, 4 door sedan, hatchback. The seventh character indicates the type of safety restraint system that was installed at the factory. Eight character stands for the engine code – each type of engine has its own stamp. Between the eighth and the last sequence of letters is a check digit – a spacer to prevent confusion. The last sequence of digits is the grouping that singly identifies the vehicle and makes it wholly unique.

Why all this effort in creating this system and nomenclature of listing and describing each car individually. How else could the automotive trades work if they could not id each and every vehicle separately , track it , keep detailed records and lastly allow you as a car , truck , SUV , Van or motorcycle driver to research the past history of your new found vehicle.

 
 
 

Become An Automotive Collision Estimator In 13 Weeks

Every year, cars get safer and safer. But while the overall accident rate in Canada may decrease, the sad truth is that there will always be accidents, and so there will always be a need for auto body collision estimators. In this field, students learn how to use manual and computer systems to develop accurate estimates for automotive repair shops, garages, insurance companies, and other automotive-related establishments.

If you have an interest in the automotive industry, and want to learn more about cars and earn a respectable salary, an Auto Body Collision Estimator program may be right for you. These programs teach students all the basics of collision damage repair and repair estimating. Graduates enter the workforce quickly and can expect to earn $40,000 a year plus benefits on average or more depending on the type of employment they find.

Perhaps one of the most interesting things about the program is its compressed timeframe: students can expect to complete most Auto Body Collision Estimator programs in 13 weeks, which means a swift return to the workforce. Throughout the duration of their studies, students learn the key elements of labour, repair, and painting times for auto repair. They also learn how to identify auto body structures and damage. Students are also exposed to the industry-standard software that will help them create computer-generated estimation reports.

Courses are typically given by experienced auto body collision estimators who are always ready to share their know-how with students. Typical courses for the program would cover the following topics:

-Automotive industry basics
-Procedures related to material damage
-Vehicle construction
-Analyzing damage
-Principles of estimation
-Mitchell flat rate estimating
-Basic paint estimating
-Body shop operations basics
-Preparing estimates
-Automated estimating basics
-Introduction to Audatex estimating

An interesting study option for many students of Auto Body Collision Estimator programs is “distance” or online learning. With that option, students can study from the comfort of their homes, while still covering the same material as the standard program. Learning, testing, and instructional support are all done online, ensuring that graduates have all they need to be employable immediately upon graduation. This option is of particular interest to students who live outside of large cities, where schools may not exist, but where jobs for auto body estimators will often exist.

If you love cars and are interested in starting a career in the automotive industry, you may want to consider enrolling in an Auto Body Collision Estimator program. You’ll get the technical and practical knowledge you need to enjoy a rewarding job, and you’ll go from classroom to paid employment in a relatively short period of time.

 
 
 

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